The Kingdom of Sedimentary Rock and SSP

Back in 2010 I was given the wonderful opportunity to visit some of the most astoundingly beautiful locations in the United States, places I had long dreamed of visiting but curiously had never prioritized. My sister’s wedding in Las Vegas required her one and only sibling’s presence and our parents, aware of my finances, graciously paid for the plane ticket.

Though my stay was only for five days of which two days required my presence at the obligatory family events (wouldn’t have missed my sister’s wedding for the Grand Canyon!), I still managed to steal away on a whirlwind road trip to four of the most photogenic sites in a neighbourhood crowded with natural wonders beckoning the souls of the hiker, photographer, adventurer, and naturalist.

Upon returning to Japan I desired to write about my impressions of the geologic history and share them alongside my photographs with a Japanese audience. I worked hard to write up an article and had my manager check over my Japanese. It took time to complete and once submitted to Nippon Kamera it took time to get an affirmative response. At last my photographs were published but the text of some 1,200 characters had to be shortened to 300!

I was delighted to see my published work but still wanted to see my story in print. My membership with the Society of Scientific Photography was temporarily on hiatus, so I renewed it and promptly submitted my story and a selection of photographs to the editor of the members magazine. At last in May of this year my impressions were published in words as well as images.

The article describes in brief the rather vertical history of the Japanese archipelago with volcanoes rising up and collapsing, mountain ranges being pushed up, and rain and rivers washing and cutting away at the rising peaks. This serves to contrast the more horizontal history of the Colorado Plateau, which experienced roughly 200 million years of gradual sedimentation in seas, deltas, flood plains, and deserts. Only in recent history was the sedimentation process interrupted by uplifting, fluvial incising, and some volcanic activity. The results are these spectacular landscapes unrivaled by anything in Japan. The differences in the two landscapes are due to the distinct differences in their geologic history as well as their present locations and climates.

In the May 2014 issue of the Society for Scientific Photography

In the May 2014 issue of the Society for Scientific Photography

Clockwise from top left: Zion Canyon - The Narrows; Valley of Fire - Strata at dawn; Valley of Fire - Differential weathering; Red Rock Canyon - strata

Clockwise from top left: Zion Canyon – The Narrows; Valley of Fire – Strata at dawn; Valley of Fire – Differential weathering; Red Rock Canyon – strata

Bryce Canyon and Valley of Fire aeolian erosion (bottom left)

Bryce Canyon and Valley of Fire aeolian erosion (bottom left)

One response to “The Kingdom of Sedimentary Rock and SSP

  1. Congratulations on getting such an impressive-looking article together – the cross-overs between geology and art are, indeed, legion, as your photos show. Now you’ve done the “Kingdom of Sedimentary Rocks”, what about moving on to a Japanese theme – the “Principality of Plutonic Rocks”, perhaps…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s